Quantum Physics and the like...

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special_k
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Post by special_k » Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:02 pm

Chamberess wrote:That was hot until you started to sound like you know wayyyyyyy too much about apparel for men.

Diesel Viker jeans, brown havaianas and a cool tshirt from Threadless or The Ryde...now thats a hot look on a guy.


Sure darling but it is winter. Gee you are pretty picky. You must be pretty hot Cress to be as such in Sydney - land of shortage of great looking , intelligent , sensitive , worldly , funny and fit guys. Not many of us around so I've been told.

Chamberess wrote:Back on topic: The total Lunar Eclipse kicks in Tuesday next week...anyone see the moon last night..amazing 8)


Tomorrow hey sweetheart. Around 6.30pm. I'll think of you. 8)

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Post by special_k » Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:05 pm

Damage wrote:Stop Press!!

Massive hole found in Universe!!

Read on:

The universe has a huge hole in it that dwarfs anything else of its kind. 8)


Keep all this kind of stuff coming Damage. God-damn interesting mate. Well done.

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Post by Chamberess » Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:24 pm

Damage> some interesting stuff there, thanks for sharing :)

I guess computer simulations of our universe need some updating :P

Really makes you wonder what is out there given the 'surprise findings' that keep taking place and changing our understanding of the universe.

No, don't start with aliens please :?

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Post by ric_vidal » Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:37 pm

Damage wrote:
ric_vidal wrote:
Damage wrote:most of the matter in the universe is invisible

And that’s the stuff (technical term) that does matter.


Ironical eh?

I probably look upon it from a different perspective D-Mag. The realm of possibilities is not what we know, can see or yet can prove. So in some ways it is good to know that ‘science’ and its computer simulations are not always correct, or should I say, have a few misconceptions.

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ric_vidal
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Post by ric_vidal » Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:42 pm

Chamberess wrote:Really makes you wonder what is out there given the 'surprise findings' that keep taking place and changing our understanding of the universe.

No, don't start with aliens please :?

Why not? I’m sure I’m living with at least one who couldn’t be a child of ours. :evil:

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Post by vb » Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:01 pm

Anyone got any thoughts about accretion theory? ie would the dust disc orbiting a proto-sun form one solid satellite or two smaller ones (in oppostion to each other)?

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Damage
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Post by Damage » Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:39 pm

Don't forget that the moon passes through the earth's shadow tonight (tues) at about 7.30.

8)

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Post by Chamberess » Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:42 pm

Nice update Damage.

I am looking forward to it 8)

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Butts
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Post by Butts » Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:59 pm

Damage, I'm enjoying the "broadening" of my understanding 8)

So, i wish to offer something back.......
I located today, which when thought about brings "so much" into question, this article :shock:

Scientists Break the light fantastic
IT was supposed to be the one speed limit you could not break.

But scientists claim to have demonstrated there is the possibility of travel faster than the speed of light.

The feat contradicts one of the key tenets of Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity - that nothing,
under any circumstances, can move faster than 300,000km a second, or the speed of light.

Travelling faster than light also, in theory, turns back time.

According to conventional physics, a person moving beyond light speed would arrive at his destination before leaving.

But two German physicists claim to have forced light to overcome its own speed limit using the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling.

Their experiments focused on the travel of microwave photons - energetic packets of light - through two prisms.

When the prisms were moved apart, most photons reflected off the first prism they encountered and were picked up by a detector.

But a few appeared to "tunnel" through a gap separating them as if the prisms were still held together.

Although these photons had travelled a longer distance, they arrived at their detector at the same time as the reflected photons.

This suggests the transit between the two prisms was faster than the speed of light.

Dr Gunter Nimtz, of the University of Koblenz, told the magazine New Scientist: "For the time being, this is the only violation
of special relativity that I know of."


:shock: Farrkkkkkk :o

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Post by special_k » Tue Aug 28, 2007 4:12 pm

Butts wrote:Damage, I'm enjoying the "broadening" of my understanding 8)

So, i wish to offer something back.......

:shock: Farrkkkkkk :o


Good one Butts!

Imagine tunnelling back in time to Bali (with a good board) to say 1963. 8)

Of-course Larry would probably be there.......... :lol:

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Post by Damage » Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:44 pm

I'd say we are probably yet to fully explore and comprehend what ole Ed first stumbled onto....... :D



Edward Lorenz, father of chaos theory, dead at 90
Wed Apr 16, 2008 6:46pm EDT

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Edward Lorenz, the father of chaos theory, who showed how small actions could lead to major changes in what became known as the "butterfly effect," died of cancer on Wednesday at the age of 90, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said.

Lorenz, a meteorologist, figured out in the 1960s that small differences in a dynamic system such as the atmosphere could set off enormous changes. In 1972 he presented a study entitled "Predictability: Does the Flap of a Butterfly's Wings in Brazil Set Off a Tornado in Texas?"

Born in 1917 in West Hartford, Connecticut, Lorenz earned degrees in mathematics from Dartmouth College in 1938, from Harvard University in 1940, and degrees in meteorology from MIT in 1943 and 1948.

While serving as a weather forecaster for the U.S. Army Air Corps in World War Two, he decided to study meteorology.

"As a boy I was always interested in doing things with numbers, and was also fascinated by changes in the weather," Lorenz wrote in an autobiography.

"By showing that certain deterministic systems have formal predictability limits, Lorenz put the last nail in the coffin of the Cartesian universe and fomented what some have called the third scientific revolution of the 20th century, following on the heels of relativity and quantum physics," said Kerry Emanuel, professor of atmospheric science at MIT.

"He was also a perfect gentleman, and through his intelligence, integrity and humility set a very high standard for his and succeeding generations," Emanuel added in a statement.

In 1991, Lorenz won the Kyoto Prize for basic sciences in the field of earth and planetary sciences.

The prize committee said Lorenz "made his boldest scientific achievement in discovering 'deterministic chaos,' a principle which has profoundly influenced a wide range of basic sciences and brought about one of the most dramatic changes in mankind's view of nature since Sir Isaac Newton."

Lorenz, who enjoyed hiking and cross-country skiing, stayed active until two weeks before his death at home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, his family said. He is survived by three children and four grandchildren.

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Post by vb » Sun Apr 20, 2008 5:00 pm

Anyone with any conCERNS about CERN? The LHC kicks off next month and is trying to find the Higgs bosun worth the risk of vaporizing the universe?

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Post by Damage » Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:03 pm

vb wrote:is trying to find the Higgs bosun worth the risk of vaporizing the universe?


That would be hilarious! :lol:

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Post by Buff_Brad » Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:15 pm

vb wrote:Anyone with any conCERNS about CERN? The LHC kicks off next month and is trying to find the Higgs bosun worth the risk of vaporizing the universe?


The miniture blacks holes created are "apparently" supposed to evaporate quickly away before they have a chance to grow......but if they got that wrong.......yeah I agree with Damage....it would be hilarious.

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Post by vb » Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:18 pm

Totally agree; just a bit unsure if we'd have the time to see the humour in it ... THE BIG RIP

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Kunji
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Post by Kunji » Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:14 pm

vb wrote:Anyone with any conCERNS about CERN? The LHC kicks off next month and is trying to find the Higgs bosun worth the risk of vaporizing the universe?


I cant wait! Like Buff says, it'll be only a smallest fraction of a second. They reckon if they dont find the particle, that it would be more interesting! But i think this is just so they dont think they have wasted all their time and money. :lol:

There was a good article in the March Nat Geo. Did anyone read it?

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Post by AlbyAl » Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:48 pm

I'd just like to butt in for a second and say that I found this thread really interesting (didn't catch it last year) - being a bit of a nerd meself, but being pretty average with the science - it's great to know other nerds of different ilks are atop surf craft. I'll look across the weegend line-up with a bit more warmth in future.

Surely nothing will really happen at CERN besides the experimental creation of a temporary physical anomaly, and results will be heavily circumscribed by the parameters of the forces they can generate. Maybe a bit more insight into astrophysics - but those meaty questions some posed earlier about dark energy and dark matter and the overall configuration of the universe (please no multiverses) - a lot of speculation still.
(share the excitement though!)

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Kunji
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Post by Kunji » Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:11 pm

:arrow:
Last edited by Kunji on Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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