Cutbacks on a longboard

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by kayu » Wed Nov 16, 2011 8:34 pm

alakaboo wrote:67 was the start of 10 years of cyclone summers the likes of which haven't been seen since. I've got an inkling that'll change soon.
.....reaching a peak in 74 ?........the next 3 months will be interesting...

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by No Pants Lance » Wed Nov 16, 2011 8:51 pm

It was back in '84, we were sitting in my canary yellow '67 Chev Impala, up on the headland above Ben Buckler, me and some associates who'd brought out Jean Baudrillard for the Future*Fall conference. We were knocking back tinnies of VB, which Jean took a liking to, watching a small crew pick off a few sets from a solid nor east ground swell that'd come down from a north coast low, and Jean sagaciously qipped.." the drop knee did not take place ". I was stunned. As well you all know, he said the same thing about the year 2000, several years later and of the Iraq war, again a couple of years after that. Prescience was not his specialty. But he sure as he'll had a convincing manner. And his dress sense? ... well, simply he had style.
Roy, I'm sure has another agenda going down here, but the thing is, the philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's “Copernican revolution,” that is, his assumption that we cannot know things in themselves and that objects of knowledge must conform to our faculties of representation. Ideas such as God, freedom, immortality, the world, first beginning, and final end have only a regulative function for knowledge, since they cannot find fulfilling instances among objects of experience. With Hegel, the immediacy of the subject-object relation itself is shown to be illusory. As he states in The Phenomenology of Spirit, “we find that neither the one nor the other is only immediately present in sense-certainty, but each is at the same time mediated” , because subject and object are both instances of a “this” and a “now,” neither of which are immediately sensed. So-called immediate perception therefore lacks the certainty of immediacy itself, a certainty that must be deferred to the working out of a complete system of experience. However, later thinkers point out that Hegel's logic pre-supposes concepts, such as identity and negation, which cannot themselves be accepted as immediately given, and which therefore must be accounted for in some other, non-dialectical way.

The later nineteenth century is the age of modernity as an achieved reality, where science and technology, including networks of mass communication and transportation, reshape human perceptions. There is no clear distinction, then, between the natural and the artificial in experience. Indeed, many proponents of postmodernism challenge the viability of such a distinction tout court, seeing in achieved modernism the emergence of a problem the philosophical tradition has repressed. A consequence of achieved modernism is what postmodernists might refer to as de-realization. De-realization affects both the subject and the objects of experience, such that their sense of identity, constancy, and substance is upset or dissolved. Important precursors to this notion are found in Kierkegaard, Marx and Nietzsche. Kierkegaard, for example, describes modern society as a network of relations in which individuals are leveled into an abstract phantom known as “the public”. The modern public, in contrast to ancient and medieval communities, is a creation of the press, which is the only instrument capable of holding together the mass of unreal individuals “who never are and never can be united in an actual situation or organization”. In this sense, society has become a realization of abstract thought, held together by an artificial and all-pervasive medium speaking for everyone and for no one. In Marx, on the other hand, we have an analysis of the fetishism of commodities where objects lose the solidity of their use value and become spectral figures under the aspect of exchange value. Their ghostly nature results from their absorption into a network of social relations, where their values fluctuate independently of their corporeal being. Human subjects themselves experience this de-realization because commodities are products of their labor. Workers paradoxically lose their being in realizing themselves, and this becomes emblematic for those professing a postmodern sensibility.

So in effect, Roy does not take place. He is but a simulacrum. A chimerical phantasm. And his objects exist only in some vortexed black hole. In a perpetual state of hyper reality. :wink:

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Roy_Stewart » Wed Nov 16, 2011 8:52 pm

alakaboo wrote:
Roy_Stewart wrote:Hi Steve I realise that it's possible to argue that anything a person does is a form of self expression, so I'd better explain what I mean.

I don't surf in order to express my personality, to be artistic, or to exhibit or experience 'style'.

I inhabit a more primeval mindset, it isn't sociable or enjoyable in the usual sense, it's more akin to stalking and hunting. I prefer to ride without accents, great moves or spectacular moments of crisis. I work hard and seriously to own and make waves, naturally preferring to dominate the lineup.

Does that make sense?
Yes.
Actually, hang on...are you a shark?
If not, you're off your trolley.
In a sense, yes.

It's a perfectly sane attitude.

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Roy_Stewart » Wed Nov 16, 2011 8:56 pm

Hatchman wrote:
Roy_Stewart wrote:I don't surf in order to express my personality, to be artistic, or to exhibit or experience 'style'.
Oh really?

So a kilt wearing, bearded lunatic driving to the beach in a renovated school bus wearing a salmon coloured wettie riding a piece of lumber 100 metres long in a constant poo-stance squatting motion does not hint at expressing ones personality?
I have no idea, and I know of no such person.

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by alakaboo » Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:33 pm

kayu wrote:
alakaboo wrote:67 was the start of 10 years of cyclone summers the likes of which haven't been seen since. I've got an inkling that'll change soon.
.....reaching a peak in 74 ?........the next 3 months will be interesting...
I'd say later summer will be the most interesting time.

Yeah, 74 was the big year, more in terms of how many large events there were in a short period than a single event.
From what I've heard, 54 was a bigger event. There are pics from Tweed Heads of trees 1m in diameter sheared off about a metre from the ground.

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by kayu » Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:08 pm

skipper wrote:It was back in '84, we were sitting in my canary yellow '67 Chev Impala, up on the headland above Ben Buckler, me and some associates who'd brought out Jean Baudrillard for the Future*Fall conference. We were knocking back tinnies of VB, which Jean took a liking to, watching a small crew pick off a few sets from a solid nor east ground swell that'd come down from a north coast low, and Jean sagaciously qipped.." the drop knee did not take place ". I was stunned. As well you all know, he said the same thing about the year 2000, several years later and of the Iraq war, again a couple of years after that. Prescience was not his specialty. But he sure as he'll had a convincing manner. And his dress sense? ... well, simply he had style.
Roy, I'm sure has another agenda going down here, but the thing is, the philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's “Copernican revolution,” that is, his assumption that we cannot know things in themselves and that objects of knowledge must conform to our faculties of representation. Ideas such as God, freedom, immortality, the world, first beginning, and final end have only a regulative function for knowledge, since they cannot find fulfilling instances among objects of experience. With Hegel, the immediacy of the subject-object relation itself is shown to be illusory. As he states in The Phenomenology of Spirit, “we find that neither the one nor the other is only immediately present in sense-certainty, but each is at the same time mediated” , because subject and object are both instances of a “this” and a “now,” neither of which are immediately sensed. So-called immediate perception therefore lacks the certainty of immediacy itself, a certainty that must be deferred to the working out of a complete system of experience. However, later thinkers point out that Hegel's logic pre-supposes concepts, such as identity and negation, which cannot themselves be accepted as immediately given, and which therefore must be accounted for in some other, non-dialectical way.

The later nineteenth century is the age of modernity as an achieved reality, where science and technology, including networks of mass communication and transportation, reshape human perceptions. There is no clear distinction, then, between the natural and the artificial in experience. Indeed, many proponents of postmodernism challenge the viability of such a distinction tout court, seeing in achieved modernism the emergence of a problem the philosophical tradition has repressed. A consequence of achieved modernism is what postmodernists might refer to as de-realization. De-realization affects both the subject and the objects of experience, such that their sense of identity, constancy, and substance is upset or dissolved. Important precursors to this notion are found in Kierkegaard, Marx and Nietzsche. Kierkegaard, for example, describes modern society as a network of relations in which individuals are leveled into an abstract phantom known as “the public”. The modern public, in contrast to ancient and medieval communities, is a creation of the press, which is the only instrument capable of holding together the mass of unreal individuals “who never are and never can be united in an actual situation or organization”. In this sense, society has become a realization of abstract thought, held together by an artificial and all-pervasive medium speaking for everyone and for no one. In Marx, on the other hand, we have an analysis of the fetishism of commodities where objects lose the solidity of their use value and become spectral figures under the aspect of exchange value. Their ghostly nature results from their absorption into a network of social relations, where their values fluctuate independently of their corporeal being. Human subjects themselves experience this de-realization because commodities are products of their labor. Workers paradoxically lose their being in realizing themselves, and this becomes emblematic for those professing a postmodern sensibility.

:
...I couldn't agree more... :shock:

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Beanpole » Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:40 pm

skipper wrote:
So in effect, Roy does not take place. He is but a simulacrum. A chimerical phantasm. And his objects exist only in some vortexed black hole. In a perpetual state of hyper reality. :wink:
Thats our Roy :geek: :geek: :geek: :geek:

In 74 a boulder the size of a car was thrown up on the road at Kirra Point by the cyclone swell :shock: :shock:

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by alakaboo » Wed Nov 16, 2011 11:23 pm

Beanpole wrote:In 74 a boulder the size of a car was thrown up on the road at Kirra Point by the cyclone swell :shock: :shock:
which one? May, I'm guessing.

I used to help out with tsunami research, which gives you a bit of perspective when talking about large storms. There's a record of a sperm whale (40+ tonnes) on top of a cliff near Wellington that is over 35m high....

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by oldman » Thu Nov 17, 2011 12:14 am

A topic titled 'cutbacks on a longboard' gets to 11 pages! :shock:

Now I'm not going back and reading this shite, but figure this. A topic about a mythical move that has never been performed by anybody gets to 11 pages, so I'm assuming there are 3 earnest attempts to respond to this mythical imagining, followed by 11 pages of tangential discussions of no fixed abode interspersed with philosophical meanderings of unspeakable erudition that do not belong on any internet site.

Yeah I'm looking at you skip.

In summary, can anyone tell me if there is anything even remotely interesting in these 11 pages. I fear that if I look I will hate myself.
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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by kayu » Thu Nov 17, 2011 2:58 am

.....I thought the interspersed philosophical meandering weren't too bad... :?

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Davros » Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:27 am

kayu wrote:
skipper wrote:It was back in '84, we were sitting in my canary yellow '67 Chev Impala, up on the headland above Ben Buckler, me and some associates who'd brought out Jean Baudrillard for the Future*Fall conference. We were knocking back tinnies of VB, which Jean took a liking to, watching a small crew pick off a few sets from a solid nor east ground swell that'd come down from a north coast low, and Jean sagaciously qipped.." the drop knee did not take place ". I was stunned. As well you all know, he said the same thing about the year 2000, several years later and of the Iraq war, again a couple of years after that. Prescience was not his specialty. But he sure as he'll had a convincing manner. And his dress sense? ... well, simply he had style.
Roy, I'm sure has another agenda going down here, but the thing is, the philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's “Copernican revolution,” that is, his assumption that we cannot know things in themselves and that objects of knowledge must conform to our faculties of representation. Ideas such as God, freedom, immortality, the world, first beginning, and final end have only a regulative function for knowledge, since they cannot find fulfilling instances among objects of experience. With Hegel, the immediacy of the subject-object relation itself is shown to be illusory. As he states in The Phenomenology of Spirit, “we find that neither the one nor the other is only immediately present in sense-certainty, but each is at the same time mediated” , because subject and object are both instances of a “this” and a “now,” neither of which are immediately sensed. So-called immediate perception therefore lacks the certainty of immediacy itself, a certainty that must be deferred to the working out of a complete system of experience. However, later thinkers point out that Hegel's logic pre-supposes concepts, such as identity and negation, which cannot themselves be accepted as immediately given, and which therefore must be accounted for in some other, non-dialectical way.

The later nineteenth century is the age of modernity as an achieved reality, where science and technology, including networks of mass communication and transportation, reshape human perceptions. There is no clear distinction, then, between the natural and the artificial in experience. Indeed, many proponents of postmodernism challenge the viability of such a distinction tout court, seeing in achieved modernism the emergence of a problem the philosophical tradition has repressed. A consequence of achieved modernism is what postmodernists might refer to as de-realization. De-realization affects both the subject and the objects of experience, such that their sense of identity, constancy, and substance is upset or dissolved. Important precursors to this notion are found in Kierkegaard, Marx and Nietzsche. Kierkegaard, for example, describes modern society as a network of relations in which individuals are leveled into an abstract phantom known as “the public”. The modern public, in contrast to ancient and medieval communities, is a creation of the press, which is the only instrument capable of holding together the mass of unreal individuals “who never are and never can be united in an actual situation or organization”. In this sense, society has become a realization of abstract thought, held together by an artificial and all-pervasive medium speaking for everyone and for no one. In Marx, on the other hand, we have an analysis of the fetishism of commodities where objects lose the solidity of their use value and become spectral figures under the aspect of exchange value. Their ghostly nature results from their absorption into a network of social relations, where their values fluctuate independently of their corporeal being. Human subjects themselves experience this de-realization because commodities are products of their labor. Workers paradoxically lose their being in realizing themselves, and this becomes emblematic for those professing a postmodern sensibility.

:
...I couldn't agree more... :shock:
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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by steve shearer » Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:02 pm

skipper wrote:It was back in '84, we were sitting in my canary yellow '67 Chev Impala, up on the headland above Ben Buckler, me and some associates who'd brought out Jean Baudrillard for the Future*Fall conference. We were knocking back tinnies of VB, which Jean took a liking to, watching a small crew pick off a few sets from a solid nor east ground swell that'd come down from a north coast low, and Jean sagaciously qipped.." the drop knee did not take place ". I was stunned. As well you all know, he said the same thing about the year 2000, several years later and of the Iraq war, again a couple of years after that. Prescience was not his specialty. But he sure as he'll had a convincing manner. And his dress sense? ... well, simply he had style.
Roy, I'm sure has another agenda going down here, but the thing is, the philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's “Copernican revolution,” that is, his assumption that we cannot know things in themselves and that objects of knowledge must conform to our faculties of representation. Ideas such as God, freedom, immortality, the world, first beginning, and final end have only a regulative function for knowledge, since they cannot find fulfilling instances among objects of experience. With Hegel, the immediacy of the subject-object relation itself is shown to be illusory. As he states in The Phenomenology of Spirit, “we find that neither the one nor the other is only immediately present in sense-certainty, but each is at the same time mediated” , because subject and object are both instances of a “this” and a “now,” neither of which are immediately sensed. So-called immediate perception therefore lacks the certainty of immediacy itself, a certainty that must be deferred to the working out of a complete system of experience. However, later thinkers point out that Hegel's logic pre-supposes concepts, such as identity and negation, which cannot themselves be accepted as immediately given, and which therefore must be accounted for in some other, non-dialectical way.

The later nineteenth century is the age of modernity as an achieved reality, where science and technology, including networks of mass communication and transportation, reshape human perceptions. There is no clear distinction, then, between the natural and the artificial in experience. Indeed, many proponents of postmodernism challenge the viability of such a distinction tout court, seeing in achieved modernism the emergence of a problem the philosophical tradition has repressed. A consequence of achieved modernism is what postmodernists might refer to as de-realization. De-realization affects both the subject and the objects of experience, such that their sense of identity, constancy, and substance is upset or dissolved. Important precursors to this notion are found in Kierkegaard, Marx and Nietzsche. Kierkegaard, for example, describes modern society as a network of relations in which individuals are leveled into an abstract phantom known as “the public”. The modern public, in contrast to ancient and medieval communities, is a creation of the press, which is the only instrument capable of holding together the mass of unreal individuals “who never are and never can be united in an actual situation or organization”. In this sense, society has become a realization of abstract thought, held together by an artificial and all-pervasive medium speaking for everyone and for no one. In Marx, on the other hand, we have an analysis of the fetishism of commodities where objects lose the solidity of their use value and become spectral figures under the aspect of exchange value. Their ghostly nature results from their absorption into a network of social relations, where their values fluctuate independently of their corporeal being. Human subjects themselves experience this de-realization because commodities are products of their labor. Workers paradoxically lose their being in realizing themselves, and this becomes emblematic for those professing a postmodern sensibility.

So in effect, Roy does not take place. He is but a simulacrum. A chimerical phantasm. And his objects exist only in some vortexed black hole. In a perpetual state of hyper reality. :wink:
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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Trev » Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:11 pm

alakaboo wrote:
kayu wrote:
alakaboo wrote:67 was the start of 10 years of cyclone summers the likes of which haven't been seen since. I've got an inkling that'll change soon.
.....reaching a peak in 74 ?........the next 3 months will be interesting...
I'd say later summer will be the most interesting time.

Yeah, 74 was the big year, more in terms of how many large events there were in a short period than a single event.
From what I've heard, 54 was a bigger event. There are pics from Tweed Heads of trees 1m in diameter sheared off about a metre from the ground.
In '54, I was 6 and we came down to camp at Kirra. Had some kind of prefab hut which Dad got from army surplus IIRC.
We just got it up (in pouring rain which is all I can remember about it) and they cleared the camp out because there was a cyclone about to hit the coast around the border. So we had to go home. Two years later we moved down there permanently and built on the hill at Tugun. I was gone by '74 but in 64 or 65 we were living on the beachfornt at Bilinga and I remember a very serious weather event which I guess was a cyclone which absolutely battered out house and the surrounding area.
I curse their head & all the hairs of their head; I curse their face, their brain, their mouth, their nose, their tongue, their teeth, their forehead, their shoulders, their breast, their heart, their stomach, their back, their womb, their arms, their legs, their hands, their feet & all their body, from the top of their head to the soles of their feet, before and behind, within and without

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Trev » Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:12 pm

oldman wrote:A topic titled 'cutbacks on a longboard' gets to 11 pages! :shock:

Now I'm not going back and reading this shite, but figure this. A topic about a mythical move that has never been performed by anybody gets to 11 pages, so I'm assuming there are 3 earnest attempts to respond to this mythical imagining, followed by 11 pages of tangential discussions of no fixed abode interspersed with philosophical meanderings of unspeakable erudition that do not belong on any internet site.

Yeah I'm looking at you skip.

In summary, can anyone tell me if there is anything even remotely interesting in these 11 pages. I fear that if I look I will hate myself.
Move along olds. Nothing to see here.
I curse their head & all the hairs of their head; I curse their face, their brain, their mouth, their nose, their tongue, their teeth, their forehead, their shoulders, their breast, their heart, their stomach, their back, their womb, their arms, their legs, their hands, their feet & all their body, from the top of their head to the soles of their feet, before and behind, within and without

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by Beanpole » Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:11 pm

[quote="steve shearer"


So in effect, Roy does not take place. He is but a simulacrum. A chimerical phantasm. And his objects exist only in some vortexed black hole. In a perpetual state of hyper reality. :wink:[/quote]

too euriopeans[/quote]

Roys from New Zealand :)

Mentioning nose rides as stalls I guess you have to include their original function which was and sometimes still is to put weight on the nose and keep the fat old board from going over the back of the wave.

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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by No Pants Lance » Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:36 am

steve shearer wrote:
skipper wrote:It was back in '84, we were sitting in my canary yellow '67 Chev Impala, up on the headland above Ben Buckler, me and some associates who'd brought out Jean Baudrillard for the Future*Fall conference. We were knocking back tinnies of VB, which Jean took a liking to, watching a small crew pick off a few sets from a solid nor east ground swell that'd come down from a north coast low, and Jean sagaciously qipped.." the drop knee did not take place ". I was stunned. As well you all know, he said the same thing about the year 2000, several years later and of the Iraq war, again a couple of years after that. Prescience was not his specialty. But he sure as he'll had a convincing manner. And his dress sense? ... well, simply he had style.
Roy, I'm sure has another agenda going down here, but the thing is, the philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's “Copernican revolution,” that is, his assumption that we cannot know things in themselves and that objects of knowledge must conform to our faculties of representation. Ideas such as God, freedom, immortality, the world, first beginning, and final end have only a regulative function for knowledge, since they cannot find fulfilling instances among objects of experience. With Hegel, the immediacy of the subject-object relation itself is shown to be illusory. As he states in The Phenomenology of Spirit, “ I anticipate the return of Dino under the nomenclature - Nicksakook- and continue to call Trev an **** ”, because subject and object are both instances of a “this” and a “now,” neither of which are immediately sensed. So-called immediate perception therefore lacks the certainty of immediacy itself, a certainty that must be deferred to the working out of a complete system of experience. However, later thinkers point out that Hegel's logic pre-supposes concepts, such as identity and negation, which cannot themselves be accepted as immediately given, and which therefore must be accounted for in some other, non-dialectical way.

The later nineteenth century is the age of modernity as an achieved reality, where science and technology, including networks of mass communication and transportation, reshape human perceptions. There is no clear distinction, then, between the natural and the artificial in experience. Indeed, many proponents of postmodernism challenge the viability of such a distinction tout court, seeing in achieved modernism the emergence of a problem the philosophical tradition has repressed. A consequence of achieved modernism is what postmodernists might refer to as de-realization. De-realization affects both the subject and the objects of experience, such that their sense of identity, constancy, and substance is upset or dissolved. Important precursors to this notion are found in Kierkegaard, Marx and Nietzsche. Kierkegaard, for example, describes modern society as a network of relations in which individuals are leveled into an abstract phantom known as “the public”. The modern public, in contrast to ancient and medieval communities, is a creation of the press, which is the only instrument capable of holding together the mass of unreal individuals “who never are and never can be united in an actual situation or organization”. In this sense, society has become a realization of abstract thought, held together by an artificial and all-pervasive medium speaking for everyone and for no one. In Marx, on the other hand, we have an analysis of the fetishism of commodities where objects lose the solidity of their use value and become spectral figures under the aspect of exchange value. Their ghostly nature results from their absorption into a network of social relations, where their values fluctuate independently of their corporeal being. Human subjects themselves experience this de-realization because commodities are products of their labor. Workers paradoxically lose their being in realizing themselves, and this becomes emblematic for those professing a postmodern sensibility.

So in effect, Roy does not take place. He is but a simulacrum. A chimerical phantasm. And his objects exist only in some vortexed black hole. In a perpetual state of hyper reality. :wink:
too euriopeans
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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by steve shearer » Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:47 am

Sorry Skip.....I thought your analysis was brilliant.

I um....just thought it a bit euro-centric.

Those old spider web spinners of the spirit: always hoping to snare reality in their conceptual webs.
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Re: Cutbacks on a longboard

Post by offshore1 » Fri Nov 18, 2011 2:10 pm

Kierkegaard's a kook, Marx and Nietzsche are hodads
"Fear and Trembling" indeed. Soren pissed himself any time it got over head high...
Superman? Friedrich couldn't even duck dive.
And don't get me started about Karl and his tight che tshirts..
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