Bribie Island Board Riders

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steve shearer
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:32 pm

Bungaree became the first known Aboriginal person to circumnavigate Australia and contribute to the mapping of the Australian coastline.

A short man with a sharp intellect, Bungaree arrived in Sydney in the 1790s with the remains of his Kuring-gai mob, after conflicts with white settlers had escalated along the Hawkesbury River. He must have quickly made a mark in the fledging colony, as by 1798 he was employed on a 60-day round trip to Norfolk Island on the HMS Reliance, where he met the young English naval lieutenant Matthew Flinders. Flinders was so impressed with Bungaree’s friendly demeanour, intuition and bravery that the following year he took him on a coastal survey voyage to Bribie Island and Hervey Bay (Qld) on the 25-tonne longboat Norfolk.

Bungaree was a brilliant diplomat and despite language barriers could quickly ascertain the wishes of the coastal Aboriginal groups they encountered. Flinders therefore used him again on his most exploratory voyage, the circumnavigation of Australia in the HMS Investigator, from 1802 to 1803. It was on this expedition that much of Australia’s unknown coastline was mapped.

Back in Sydney, Bungaree established a reputation as a brilliant mimic, imitating the walk and mannerisms of various governors and personalities. He was given fine clothing, including military cloaks and a hat. Governor Macquarie took a particular liking to Bungaree, and gave him both the fictitious title ‘King of the Broken Bay Aborigines’ and the first Aboriginal land grant, on Georges Head, where he briefly grew peaches and other produce.

In 1817, Bungaree sailed to north-western Australia with Phillip Parker King in the 76-tonne cutter HMS Mermaid, again showing his skill as a diplomat and intermediary between white and black people. He died in Sydney in 1830 and was buried at Rose Bay.

Many paintings exist of Bungaree in his European garb. He is also remembered through the naming of the Bongaree settlement on Bribie Island and, early in 2015, the naming of a walk at Mosman, Sydney, from Chowder Bay to Georges Heights, where his farm had been located.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:35 pm

Bribie Island is named after a convict from the Moreton Bay penal colony who became the first European to live on the island. According to the folklore he became an expert at mud crabbing for the officers and was rewarded with his freedom. His name was Bribie and, once freed, he lived on the island for the rest of his life with a local Aboriginal woman.

Prior to European settlement Bribie Island was the home of the Gubbi Gubbi Aboriginal group who used bark canoes, nets for fishing and catching birds and spears for killing the local kangaroos and wallabies. There is also evidence that they used stone traps to catch fish. There is evidence of middens on the coasts of the island. It has been claimed that by 1897 there were no Aborigines left on the island.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by swvic » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:44 pm

Thanks the time and effort to post that, steve. Always interested in Aboriginal history which always delivers a greater sense of what they, and we, lost
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by foamy » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:58 pm

Lucky Al wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 2:45 pm
How many Olympians have come out of Bribie Steve?
There was a gymnast.

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by Over55yrs » Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:51 pm

And I regularly walk that Bungaree track up to the lookout at Georges Heights

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:00 pm

In March 1945 he embarked in an old lifeboat, landed by chance on nearby Bribie Island, and found 'the idea of the bush that haunted me in India and brought me back here against all reason'. He stayed seven months, but, after the theft of his diaries, moved to Melbourne and to Lina Bryans's Darebin studio at Heidelberg. There he lived among other artists and worked tirelessly for two years, seemingly content. Most of the gouaches he produced were irretrievably damaged before reaching the Redfern Gallery.

At the end of 1947 Fairweather went back to Cairns and later sent his work to the Macquarie Galleries, Sydney. In September 1949 the gallery organized a solo exhibition, and subsequently showed his work almost annually until 1970. In 1949 he moved off again, through Bribie and Townsville to Darwin, where he lived in an old boat during 1951-52. His relatively scarce drawings mostly date from this Cairns-Darwin period. On 29 April 1952, having carefully studied seamanship and navigation, he set out for Timor in a small raft which he had made from discarded materials. After almost perishing, he collapsed on the beach at Roti, Indonesia, sixteen days later. He was interned, shunted to Timor, Bali and Singapore, then (apparently after diplomatic intervention) placed in a home for derelicts whence he was repatriated to England. It was some five years before direct references to the raft experience appeared in his painting (including 'Lit Bateau' and 'Roti'). In England, Fairweather dug ditches to help repay his passage, but his 'strange experience going home after twenty-five years . . . wasn't a happy one'.

Eventually his relations funded his return to Australia. Reaching Sydney in August 1953, he headed straight to Bribie, 'glad to be back in the sun . . . in the friendly bush'. On a site affording him almost complete solitude, he erected two Malay-style thatched huts of local bush materials in which to live and work. 'Roi Soleil' (1956-57) began his larger works. From mid-1958 Fairweather used synthetic polymer paint, often mixed with gouache; thereafter his works were generally more stable. Thirty-six abstract paintings sent to the Macquarie Galleries in 1959-60 are among Australia's finest. 'Last Supper' (1958) was the first of his great religious subjects; 'Monastery' (1961) won the John McCaughey Prize in 1966; and his largest, 'Epiphany' (1962), Fairweather thought his best. His exhibition at the Macquarie Galleries in August 1962 remains significant in Australian art history. From early 1963 Fairweather devoted more time to translating and less to painting: he translated and illustrated The Drunken Buddha (1965). His painting, 'Turtle and Temple Gong', won the W. D. & H. O. Wills prize in 1965. A travelling retrospective exhibition of eighty-eight of his works, mounted by the Queensland Art Gallery that year, enabled Fairweather to see, for the first time, his paintings publicly shown. His work had also been included in the Bienal de Sao Paulo, Brazil (1963), and toured Europe with 'Australian Painting Today' (1964-65) and Asia with 'Contemporary Australian Paintings' (1967-68).

Bribie's increasing accessibility and tourist appeal—acknowledged in 'Barbecue' (1963)—together with the publicity that surrounded his exhibitions, prompted Fairweather to leave Australia on 7 August 1965. He went to Singapore and India, then returned in September. One year later he flew to London, where he contemplated establishing a studio. Realizing that he was a misfit, he came back to Bribie. He briefly resumed abstract painting in 1968, producing his last great work, 'House by the Sea'. In 1973 his fellow artists bestowed on Fairweather the International Co-operation Art Award for his outstanding contribution to art in Australia. About 1970 publicity had prompted investigations which revealed that he owed a five-figure sum to the taxation office. Fairweather's inability or unwillingness to accept his increasing income had prompted the Macquarie Galleries to establish a trust account on his behalf. The realization of his financial security came too late for his enjoyment. Plagued by arthritis and cardiac disease, from 1969 he had found it hard to stand and paint (in his customary manner) over a low, flat table. He died on 20 May 1974 in Royal Brisbane Hospital and was cremated with Presbyterian forms.

Fairweather's work is held by the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, all State and many regional galleries, the Tate gallery, London, the Leicester art gallery and the Ulster museum, Belfast. Many influences affected him, including Turner, Cézanne, Chinese culture and Buddhism. Chinese calligraphy, Post-Impressionism, cubism, abstraction and Aboriginal art strengthened and individualized his style. The content of his work was significantly autobiographical, and mostly reflective. A master colourist, he used colour sparingly. Starting as a landscape painter, he became more interested in figures, almost exclusively in people 'generally speaking'. 'MO, PB and the Ti Tree' is a rare portrait of individuals. He worked slowly, making many alterations as ideas occurred to him, whether by day or at night. 'Painting to me is something of a tightrope act; it is between representation and the other thing—whatever that is. It is difficult to keep one's balance'. A tall, slim figure, with intense blue eyes, Fairweather had a shy, gentle and dignified manner. He resented interference with his style of life, which was reclusive, self-disciplined, austere, and determinedly unrestrained by society. His painting, an 'inner compulsion', was self-consuming—'It leaves no room for anything else'.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:00 pm

Image
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by foamy » Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:21 pm

Nice photo. Always seems weird in Qld to see someone on the beach in long pants and shoes, NOT that there is anything wrong with that.

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by godsavethequeen » Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:35 pm

Lucky Al wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:50 pm
I was just thinking about airplanes blowing up. We're you flying reconnaissance low over the Board Riders Pointscore ctd and collided with the club historian's drone?
Al, am I dreaming this or have you previously been in a plane crash?

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by Beanpole » Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:45 pm

My Favorite Ian Fairweathers story.....apart from his raft...is when someone sent him two pairs of pyjamas since that was all he wore. He sent one pair back since he could only wear one pair at a time.

One of the first artists I became aware of and just thought that was how artists lived.

Orange of all places has a good collection of his work.

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:31 am

foamy wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:21 pm
Nice photo. Always seems weird in Qld to see someone on the beach in long pants and shoes, NOT that there is anything wrong with that.
It's funny, last time we were on the island, I took my wife to that exact location. She has a photo of me fishing the flats there with that exact same driftwood on the beach.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by Slobadan Madicubich » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:50 am

If its the same wood its hardly fUcking drifting

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by offshore1 » Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:11 am

And he calls himself a writer.
FAKE NEWS!
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:02 am

when the revolution comes, pedantic baby boomers will be first against the wall.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by Yuke Hunt » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:31 am

steve shearer wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:02 am
when the revolution comes, pedantic baby boomers will be first against the wall.
Now, now Steven, just because you blew up a bus theres no reason to go prancing around acting like a terrorist.

By definition, driftwood needs to drift, if you get my drift.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by foamy » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:41 am

Steve's had a bad year with vehicles.

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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by steve shearer » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:42 am

Driftwood is a noun, not a verb.
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Re: Bribie Island Board Riders

Post by Drailed » Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:01 am

Gotta be honest, Bribie sounds like a hot stinking hell.
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